HIGHLIGHTS

Doors Open Day

9 to 10 September

Once-a-year chance to look behind closed doors and discover the city’s hidden treasures

Docks Heritage Weekend: 30 September and 1 October

Docks Heritage Weekend

30 September and 1 October

A celebration of Bristol’s maritime past with events for all ages at M Shed and Underfall Yard

Pump demonstrations

Hydraulic Pumps

Every Saturday at 3pm

See the 1907 Hydraulic Pumps in action. Expertly run by our volunteers.

CALENDAR

Aug
25
Fri
Regular Pump Runs
Aug 25 @ 11:30 am – 12:30 pm
Regular Pump Runs @ Underfall Yard

Wednesday and Friday mornings at approximately 11.30am – join us to see the 1907 hydraulic pumps in action.

The three electric hydraulic pumps were installed in 1907.  The pumps pressurise water to 750psi (52 bar) and powered an entire network through underground pipes running around the harbour to lock gates, swing bridges, cranes, capstans and more. Over the years many parts of the network ceased to operate – cranes were dismantled, bridges stopped swinging – and by 2010 the Power House was only operating Cumberland Basin lock gates and providing back-up for Prince Street Bridge (which has always had its own pump and accumulator).

The pumps were decommissioned in 2010 and are no longer connected to the network of pipes.  Supported by the AIM Biffa Award National Heritage Landmark Partnership Scheme, we regularly demonstrate the pumps.

[Pump demonstrations may be cancelled at short notice subject to volunteer availability and successful safety checks.]

Aug
26
Sat
Saturday Hydraulic Pump Demonstrations
Aug 26 @ 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm
Saturday Hydraulic Pump Demonstrations @ Underfall Yard

Every Saturday at approximately 3.00pm – join us to see the 1907 hydraulic pumps in action.

The three electric hydraulic pumps were installed in 1907.  The pumps pressurise water to 750psi (52 bar) and powered an entire network through underground pipes running around the harbour to lock gates, swing bridges, cranes, capstans and more. Over the years many parts of the network ceased to operate – cranes were dismantled, bridges stopped swinging – and by 2010 the Power House was only operating Cumberland Basin lock gates and providing back-up for Prince Street Bridge (which has always had its own pump and accumulator).

The pumps were decommissioned in 2010 and are no longer connected to the network of pipes.  Our new Workshop Manager, Rachel, has been working out how to run the pumps for demonstration purposes now that the pressurised water isn’t being used.  On a few occasions we used the pressure relief valves on the pumps.  This was problematic on two counts: it is an emergency feature so forcing the valve too frequently risks causing damage and it dumps all the water into the Pump Room basement!  The other option was to do nothing but this would mean waiting hours, if not days, for the pressurise to gradually reduce through small leaks in the system.  But, with the support of Bristol City Council’s Docks Engineer’s team, Rachel has identified our current solution: we are currently using a hose to return the dock water to the harbour, and de-pressurise the pumps.

Supported by the AIM Biffa Award National Heritage Landmark Partnership Scheme.

[Pump demonstrations may be cancelled at short notice subject to volunteer availability and successful safety checks.]

Aug
30
Wed
Regular Pump Runs
Aug 30 @ 11:30 am – 12:30 pm
Regular Pump Runs @ Underfall Yard

Wednesday and Friday mornings at approximately 11.30am – join us to see the 1907 hydraulic pumps in action.

The three electric hydraulic pumps were installed in 1907.  The pumps pressurise water to 750psi (52 bar) and powered an entire network through underground pipes running around the harbour to lock gates, swing bridges, cranes, capstans and more. Over the years many parts of the network ceased to operate – cranes were dismantled, bridges stopped swinging – and by 2010 the Power House was only operating Cumberland Basin lock gates and providing back-up for Prince Street Bridge (which has always had its own pump and accumulator).

The pumps were decommissioned in 2010 and are no longer connected to the network of pipes.  Supported by the AIM Biffa Award National Heritage Landmark Partnership Scheme, we regularly demonstrate the pumps.

[Pump demonstrations may be cancelled at short notice subject to volunteer availability and successful safety checks.]

Sep
1
Fri
Regular Pump Runs
Sep 1 @ 11:30 am – 12:30 pm
Regular Pump Runs @ Underfall Yard

Wednesday and Friday mornings at approximately 11.30am – join us to see the 1907 hydraulic pumps in action.

The three electric hydraulic pumps were installed in 1907.  The pumps pressurise water to 750psi (52 bar) and powered an entire network through underground pipes running around the harbour to lock gates, swing bridges, cranes, capstans and more. Over the years many parts of the network ceased to operate – cranes were dismantled, bridges stopped swinging – and by 2010 the Power House was only operating Cumberland Basin lock gates and providing back-up for Prince Street Bridge (which has always had its own pump and accumulator).

The pumps were decommissioned in 2010 and are no longer connected to the network of pipes.  Supported by the AIM Biffa Award National Heritage Landmark Partnership Scheme, we regularly demonstrate the pumps.

[Pump demonstrations may be cancelled at short notice subject to volunteer availability and successful safety checks.]

Sep
2
Sat
Saturday Hydraulic Pump Demonstrations
Sep 2 @ 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm
Saturday Hydraulic Pump Demonstrations @ Underfall Yard

Every Saturday at approximately 3.00pm – join us to see the 1907 hydraulic pumps in action.

The three electric hydraulic pumps were installed in 1907.  The pumps pressurise water to 750psi (52 bar) and powered an entire network through underground pipes running around the harbour to lock gates, swing bridges, cranes, capstans and more. Over the years many parts of the network ceased to operate – cranes were dismantled, bridges stopped swinging – and by 2010 the Power House was only operating Cumberland Basin lock gates and providing back-up for Prince Street Bridge (which has always had its own pump and accumulator).

The pumps were decommissioned in 2010 and are no longer connected to the network of pipes.  Our new Workshop Manager, Rachel, has been working out how to run the pumps for demonstration purposes now that the pressurised water isn’t being used.  On a few occasions we used the pressure relief valves on the pumps.  This was problematic on two counts: it is an emergency feature so forcing the valve too frequently risks causing damage and it dumps all the water into the Pump Room basement!  The other option was to do nothing but this would mean waiting hours, if not days, for the pressurise to gradually reduce through small leaks in the system.  But, with the support of Bristol City Council’s Docks Engineer’s team, Rachel has identified our current solution: we are currently using a hose to return the dock water to the harbour, and de-pressurise the pumps.

Supported by the AIM Biffa Award National Heritage Landmark Partnership Scheme.

[Pump demonstrations may be cancelled at short notice subject to volunteer availability and successful safety checks.]

Sep
6
Wed
Regular Pump Runs
Sep 6 @ 11:30 am – 12:30 pm
Regular Pump Runs @ Underfall Yard

Wednesday and Friday mornings at approximately 11.30am – join us to see the 1907 hydraulic pumps in action.

The three electric hydraulic pumps were installed in 1907.  The pumps pressurise water to 750psi (52 bar) and powered an entire network through underground pipes running around the harbour to lock gates, swing bridges, cranes, capstans and more. Over the years many parts of the network ceased to operate – cranes were dismantled, bridges stopped swinging – and by 2010 the Power House was only operating Cumberland Basin lock gates and providing back-up for Prince Street Bridge (which has always had its own pump and accumulator).

The pumps were decommissioned in 2010 and are no longer connected to the network of pipes.  Supported by the AIM Biffa Award National Heritage Landmark Partnership Scheme, we regularly demonstrate the pumps.

[Pump demonstrations may be cancelled at short notice subject to volunteer availability and successful safety checks.]

Sep
8
Fri
Regular Pump Runs
Sep 8 @ 11:30 am – 12:30 pm
Regular Pump Runs @ Underfall Yard

Wednesday and Friday mornings at approximately 11.30am – join us to see the 1907 hydraulic pumps in action.

The three electric hydraulic pumps were installed in 1907.  The pumps pressurise water to 750psi (52 bar) and powered an entire network through underground pipes running around the harbour to lock gates, swing bridges, cranes, capstans and more. Over the years many parts of the network ceased to operate – cranes were dismantled, bridges stopped swinging – and by 2010 the Power House was only operating Cumberland Basin lock gates and providing back-up for Prince Street Bridge (which has always had its own pump and accumulator).

The pumps were decommissioned in 2010 and are no longer connected to the network of pipes.  Supported by the AIM Biffa Award National Heritage Landmark Partnership Scheme, we regularly demonstrate the pumps.

[Pump demonstrations may be cancelled at short notice subject to volunteer availability and successful safety checks.]

Sep
9
Sat
Bristol Doors Open Day
Sep 9 @ 10:00 am – Sep 10 @ 4:00 pm
Bristol Doors Open Day
Saturday 9 September – Sunday 10 September 2017 10am – 4pm.  Bristol Doors Open Day is a once-a-year chance to look behind closed doors and discover the city’s hidden treasures. You can explore fascinating buildings, join guided tours and enjoy a range of events and activities – all free for the day. Join us at Underfall for a docks-angle to the fantastic celebration of Bristol’s history, architecture and culture.
Saturday Hydraulic Pump Demonstrations
Sep 9 @ 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm
Saturday Hydraulic Pump Demonstrations @ Underfall Yard

Every Saturday at approximately 3.00pm – join us to see the 1907 hydraulic pumps in action.

The three electric hydraulic pumps were installed in 1907.  The pumps pressurise water to 750psi (52 bar) and powered an entire network through underground pipes running around the harbour to lock gates, swing bridges, cranes, capstans and more. Over the years many parts of the network ceased to operate – cranes were dismantled, bridges stopped swinging – and by 2010 the Power House was only operating Cumberland Basin lock gates and providing back-up for Prince Street Bridge (which has always had its own pump and accumulator).

The pumps were decommissioned in 2010 and are no longer connected to the network of pipes.  Our new Workshop Manager, Rachel, has been working out how to run the pumps for demonstration purposes now that the pressurised water isn’t being used.  On a few occasions we used the pressure relief valves on the pumps.  This was problematic on two counts: it is an emergency feature so forcing the valve too frequently risks causing damage and it dumps all the water into the Pump Room basement!  The other option was to do nothing but this would mean waiting hours, if not days, for the pressurise to gradually reduce through small leaks in the system.  But, with the support of Bristol City Council’s Docks Engineer’s team, Rachel has identified our current solution: we are currently using a hose to return the dock water to the harbour, and de-pressurise the pumps.

Supported by the AIM Biffa Award National Heritage Landmark Partnership Scheme.

[Pump demonstrations may be cancelled at short notice subject to volunteer availability and successful safety checks.]

Sep
13
Wed
Regular Pump Runs
Sep 13 @ 11:30 am – 12:30 pm
Regular Pump Runs @ Underfall Yard

Wednesday and Friday mornings at approximately 11.30am – join us to see the 1907 hydraulic pumps in action.

The three electric hydraulic pumps were installed in 1907.  The pumps pressurise water to 750psi (52 bar) and powered an entire network through underground pipes running around the harbour to lock gates, swing bridges, cranes, capstans and more. Over the years many parts of the network ceased to operate – cranes were dismantled, bridges stopped swinging – and by 2010 the Power House was only operating Cumberland Basin lock gates and providing back-up for Prince Street Bridge (which has always had its own pump and accumulator).

The pumps were decommissioned in 2010 and are no longer connected to the network of pipes.  Supported by the AIM Biffa Award National Heritage Landmark Partnership Scheme, we regularly demonstrate the pumps.

[Pump demonstrations may be cancelled at short notice subject to volunteer availability and successful safety checks.]

Sep
15
Fri
Regular Pump Runs
Sep 15 @ 11:30 am – 12:30 pm
Regular Pump Runs @ Underfall Yard

Wednesday and Friday mornings at approximately 11.30am – join us to see the 1907 hydraulic pumps in action.

The three electric hydraulic pumps were installed in 1907.  The pumps pressurise water to 750psi (52 bar) and powered an entire network through underground pipes running around the harbour to lock gates, swing bridges, cranes, capstans and more. Over the years many parts of the network ceased to operate – cranes were dismantled, bridges stopped swinging – and by 2010 the Power House was only operating Cumberland Basin lock gates and providing back-up for Prince Street Bridge (which has always had its own pump and accumulator).

The pumps were decommissioned in 2010 and are no longer connected to the network of pipes.  Supported by the AIM Biffa Award National Heritage Landmark Partnership Scheme, we regularly demonstrate the pumps.

[Pump demonstrations may be cancelled at short notice subject to volunteer availability and successful safety checks.]

Sep
16
Sat
Saturday Hydraulic Pump Demonstrations
Sep 16 @ 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm
Saturday Hydraulic Pump Demonstrations @ Underfall Yard

Every Saturday at approximately 3.00pm – join us to see the 1907 hydraulic pumps in action.

The three electric hydraulic pumps were installed in 1907.  The pumps pressurise water to 750psi (52 bar) and powered an entire network through underground pipes running around the harbour to lock gates, swing bridges, cranes, capstans and more. Over the years many parts of the network ceased to operate – cranes were dismantled, bridges stopped swinging – and by 2010 the Power House was only operating Cumberland Basin lock gates and providing back-up for Prince Street Bridge (which has always had its own pump and accumulator).

The pumps were decommissioned in 2010 and are no longer connected to the network of pipes.  Our new Workshop Manager, Rachel, has been working out how to run the pumps for demonstration purposes now that the pressurised water isn’t being used.  On a few occasions we used the pressure relief valves on the pumps.  This was problematic on two counts: it is an emergency feature so forcing the valve too frequently risks causing damage and it dumps all the water into the Pump Room basement!  The other option was to do nothing but this would mean waiting hours, if not days, for the pressurise to gradually reduce through small leaks in the system.  But, with the support of Bristol City Council’s Docks Engineer’s team, Rachel has identified our current solution: we are currently using a hose to return the dock water to the harbour, and de-pressurise the pumps.

Supported by the AIM Biffa Award National Heritage Landmark Partnership Scheme.

[Pump demonstrations may be cancelled at short notice subject to volunteer availability and successful safety checks.]

Sep
20
Wed
Regular Pump Runs
Sep 20 @ 11:30 am – 12:30 pm
Regular Pump Runs @ Underfall Yard

Wednesday and Friday mornings at approximately 11.30am – join us to see the 1907 hydraulic pumps in action.

The three electric hydraulic pumps were installed in 1907.  The pumps pressurise water to 750psi (52 bar) and powered an entire network through underground pipes running around the harbour to lock gates, swing bridges, cranes, capstans and more. Over the years many parts of the network ceased to operate – cranes were dismantled, bridges stopped swinging – and by 2010 the Power House was only operating Cumberland Basin lock gates and providing back-up for Prince Street Bridge (which has always had its own pump and accumulator).

The pumps were decommissioned in 2010 and are no longer connected to the network of pipes.  Supported by the AIM Biffa Award National Heritage Landmark Partnership Scheme, we regularly demonstrate the pumps.

[Pump demonstrations may be cancelled at short notice subject to volunteer availability and successful safety checks.]

Sep
22
Fri
Regular Pump Runs
Sep 22 @ 11:30 am – 12:30 pm
Regular Pump Runs @ Underfall Yard

Wednesday and Friday mornings at approximately 11.30am – join us to see the 1907 hydraulic pumps in action.

The three electric hydraulic pumps were installed in 1907.  The pumps pressurise water to 750psi (52 bar) and powered an entire network through underground pipes running around the harbour to lock gates, swing bridges, cranes, capstans and more. Over the years many parts of the network ceased to operate – cranes were dismantled, bridges stopped swinging – and by 2010 the Power House was only operating Cumberland Basin lock gates and providing back-up for Prince Street Bridge (which has always had its own pump and accumulator).

The pumps were decommissioned in 2010 and are no longer connected to the network of pipes.  Supported by the AIM Biffa Award National Heritage Landmark Partnership Scheme, we regularly demonstrate the pumps.

[Pump demonstrations may be cancelled at short notice subject to volunteer availability and successful safety checks.]

Sep
23
Sat
Saturday Hydraulic Pump Demonstrations
Sep 23 @ 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm
Saturday Hydraulic Pump Demonstrations @ Underfall Yard

Every Saturday at approximately 3.00pm – join us to see the 1907 hydraulic pumps in action.

The three electric hydraulic pumps were installed in 1907.  The pumps pressurise water to 750psi (52 bar) and powered an entire network through underground pipes running around the harbour to lock gates, swing bridges, cranes, capstans and more. Over the years many parts of the network ceased to operate – cranes were dismantled, bridges stopped swinging – and by 2010 the Power House was only operating Cumberland Basin lock gates and providing back-up for Prince Street Bridge (which has always had its own pump and accumulator).

The pumps were decommissioned in 2010 and are no longer connected to the network of pipes.  Our new Workshop Manager, Rachel, has been working out how to run the pumps for demonstration purposes now that the pressurised water isn’t being used.  On a few occasions we used the pressure relief valves on the pumps.  This was problematic on two counts: it is an emergency feature so forcing the valve too frequently risks causing damage and it dumps all the water into the Pump Room basement!  The other option was to do nothing but this would mean waiting hours, if not days, for the pressurise to gradually reduce through small leaks in the system.  But, with the support of Bristol City Council’s Docks Engineer’s team, Rachel has identified our current solution: we are currently using a hose to return the dock water to the harbour, and de-pressurise the pumps.

Supported by the AIM Biffa Award National Heritage Landmark Partnership Scheme.

[Pump demonstrations may be cancelled at short notice subject to volunteer availability and successful safety checks.]

Sep
27
Wed
Regular Pump Runs
Sep 27 @ 11:30 am – 12:30 pm
Regular Pump Runs @ Underfall Yard

Wednesday and Friday mornings at approximately 11.30am – join us to see the 1907 hydraulic pumps in action.

The three electric hydraulic pumps were installed in 1907.  The pumps pressurise water to 750psi (52 bar) and powered an entire network through underground pipes running around the harbour to lock gates, swing bridges, cranes, capstans and more. Over the years many parts of the network ceased to operate – cranes were dismantled, bridges stopped swinging – and by 2010 the Power House was only operating Cumberland Basin lock gates and providing back-up for Prince Street Bridge (which has always had its own pump and accumulator).

The pumps were decommissioned in 2010 and are no longer connected to the network of pipes.  Supported by the AIM Biffa Award National Heritage Landmark Partnership Scheme, we regularly demonstrate the pumps.

[Pump demonstrations may be cancelled at short notice subject to volunteer availability and successful safety checks.]